Wednesday, 30 November 2011

Edinburgh's German Market

We took ourselves over to Edinburgh on Monday to see the German Market. It was smaller than I expected it to be but what was there was wonderful. Here are just a few photos of some of the stalls.

You can't go to a German Market and not have some strüdel. Very, very yummy!

from the sewing room window - 30 November

Tuesday, 29 November 2011

tutorial - flirty frilly half pinny

How to make a flirty frilly half pinny

Materials: use cotton fabric.
For the main body - one fat quarter or 0.5m/½ yd of 110cm/45" wide or 140cm/54" wide
For the contrast frill, waistband and pocket - 0.7m/ ¾ yd of 110cm/45" wide or 140cm/54" wide

Body pattern: I did draw it to scale but after scanning it and then messing with it in Photoshop, there are no guarantees that it's still to scale!

Pocket pattern:
Use whichever shape you fancy. I made the heart shown on this pinny but you could use a plain square - or leave it off altogether!

Cutting your pieces:
Body:
Fold your fat quarter in half and put your pattern on top putting the fold mark of the pattern on top of the fold of the fabric. (I know that sounds obvious, but it might not be to someone so I've left it in.)

Waistband/ties: contrast fabric
Cut or tear 2 strips 4" wide by the width of the fabric. Cut off the selvedge edges.

Frill: contrast fabric
Cut or tear 2 strips 5" wide by the width of the fabric. Cut off the selvedge edges. Mark the halfway point on one long edge of each piece now to make adding the frill easier.

Note: I know some people frown on tearing fabric but, in my opinion, it works really well in this case. If you hate the idea of tearing your fabric, go ahead and cut it.

Pocket: contrast fabric
Cut 2 pieces in whichever shape you decided.

Making the pinny.

Pocket.
With right sides together, sew pocket pieces together leaving a gap in one of the sides for turning.

Turn and press. Pin gap closed - no need to sew it closed.

Pin to body piece so that one corner is 5" down from top of side edge and 2" in from side. Stitch close to the edges. This closes the gap used for turning. (Note: I topstitched the top of the heart before I sewed it to the pinny body. It's not really sewn all the way around!)

Frill:
Join the 5" pieces together along one short seam. Overlock one long edge and then turn up ¼" and sew. If you don't have an overlocker, sew a double ¼" hem - turn under ¼", press, turn under another ¼" and sew.

Sew 2 rows of gathering stitches along the other long edge. I do mine at 3/8" and just less than ¼" away from raw edge.

Gather the frill and pin it to the body piece matching the seam in the frill to the fold line of the body piece and the 2 midway marks to the lower ends of the straight sides.

Stitch with a 3/8" seam. *Stitch slowly*.
Overlock or zigzag your edges together and press towards the body.

From the right side, top stitch about 1/8" away from seam to anchor the edge to the body.

Waistband/ties.
Cut one of the 4" pieces in half and join each of those half pieces to the full piece. Your waistband/ties piece will now be made up like this:

Mark the centre of the top of the main body part and mark 3" on either side of the centre. Make a 1" pleat at the outer marks.

Pin the pleats so that the top of the pleat lies towards the sides.

Tack (baste) them down by hand or machine.

Press under 3/8" on both long edges of the waistband/ties piece.

Mark the centre of the waistband piece and pin to the body on matching the centres. Sew along the fold you just pressed. Press seam up towards the waistband.

Open out each end and stitch down at an angle like this:

Trim seams and turn.

Stitch close to folded edges all around waistband.

That's it. Your pinny will now look like this.

You might also like the following tutorials: flirty frilly pinny, plain pinny, double oven gloves, single oven gloves and wee and round oven glove.

Monday, 28 November 2011

tutorial - single oven gloves

How to make single oven gloves.

Please note - I'm repeating some of the steps from the double oven gloves tutorial because I think it's important that the whole tutorial is in one place. I don't want to say things like "go here to see how to test your bump" or "go here for how to make up the pattern". If you've already made the double gloves, you'll be able to miss out these steps.

What you need:
¼ yard/20cm of 54"/137cm wide curtain fabric (wash before using)
¼ yard/20cm bump* or curtain interlining
6"/15cm ribbon

*There are a few things you can use to keep the heat from burning your fingers. I've tried a lot of options and have found that the polyester bump that my local curtain fabric shop sells is by far the best for oven gloves. There are insulated wadding/batting fabrics available but not in my town - another reason for me to use the bump - but, if you can get your hands on some, by all means use it. You can use also towelling but it takes a long time to dry and is quite bulky in the seams.

I devised a test to check my bump for heat resistance: if I can hold the oven glove (with my hand in it) on the sole plate of my iron for 10 seconds without the heat getting unbearable, then I reckon I'll be able to get the tray of biscuits or cakes out of the oven and on to a cake rack before I burn myself. Please note, if you try this yourself, BE VERY CAREFUL!!!!

How to draw the pattern:
1. Draw an 8" vertical line, XY, down the middle of your paper.
2. Mark the centre of that line and call it Z.
3. Draw a 7" horizontal line, VW, centred on Z ie 3½" each side of Z.
4. Draw 4" vertical lines down from both V and W to S and T respectively.
5. Join S to T.
6. Draw a 2" horizontal line, QR, centred on X.
7. Draw a curve freehand from V to Q. Don't draw the other curve - see next step.
8. Fold your paper along your XY line and cut out the shape. Because you're cutting the curve on the fold, both sides will turn out the same.

The first drawing was drawn to scale but I don't know if it is now after being scanned and re-scaled in Photoshop!

This is piece B. To make piece C, add 5/8" on to the length at the SYT line so that you now have 2 pieces like this: (This drawing is definitely not to scale! :oD)

Cutting:
Cut 1 x B on fold of fabric
Cut 2 x C of fabric
Cut 2 x B on fold of bump

Making them up:
Mark the foldline of the bump pieces with a marker pen or by pressing with your iron. Pin bump to the wrong side of one of the B piece matching the curved ends. Stitch down your marked foldline.

Fold back on itself along the foldline.

Fold the ribbon in half and pin the raw edges to one of the straight edges of one of the C pieces. Sew ribbon to C using a ½" seam. If you're attaching a label to your oven gloves, do it now.

With right sides together, pin one piece of C to each side of the B piece enclosing the bump in the sandwich. Stitch using a 5/8" making sure to catch in all your layers. Stitch *slowly* around the curves. If you have a walking foot, use it. It does make sewing all the layers much easier. NOTE - do NOT stitch the straight seam of C together.

It will now look like this - your C pieces are on the outside with the B/bump sandwiched between.

Trim the stitched seam to about ¼" and clip curves.

Turn through the gap bringing both C pieces together to enclose the raw edges.

Pin and sew the straight edges of C together. You can do this by hand or machine.

That's it! Easy peasy! :o)

You might also like the following tutorials: flirty frilly pinny, plain pinny, flirty frilly half pinny, double oven gloves and wee and round oven glove.

Saturday, 26 November 2011

tutorial - double oven gloves

How to make double oven gloves.

What you need:
½ yard/40cm of 54"/137cm wide curtain fabric (wash before using)
¼ yard/20cm bump* or curtain interlining
6"/15cm ribbon

*There are a few things you can use to keep the heat from burning your fingers. I've tried a lot of options and have found that the polyester bump that my local curtain fabric shop sells is by far the best for oven gloves. There are insulated wadding/batting fabrics available but not in my town - another reason for me to use the bump - but, if you can get your hands on some, by all means use it. You can use also towelling but it takes a long time to dry and is quite bulky in the seams.

I devised a test to check my bump for heat resistance: if I can hold the oven glove (with my hand in it) on the sole plate of my iron for 10 seconds without the heat getting unbearable, then I reckon I'll be able to get the tray of biscuits or cakes out of the oven and on to a cake rack before I burn myself. Please note, if you try this yourself, BE VERY CAREFUL!!!!

How to draw the pattern:
1. Draw an 8" vertical line, XY, down the middle of your paper.
2. Mark the centre of that line and call it Z.
3. Draw a 7" horizontal line, VW, centred on Z ie 3½" each side of Z.
4. Draw 4" vertical lines down from both V and W to S and T respectively.
5. Join S to T.
6. Draw a 2" horizontal line, QR, centred on X.
7. Draw a curve freehand from V to Q. Don't draw the other curve - see next step.
8. Fold your paper along your XY line and cut out the shape. Because you're cutting the curve on the fold, both sides will turn out the same.

The first drawing was drawn to scale but I don't know if it is now after being scanned and re-scaled in Photoshop!

This is piece B. To make piece A, extend from the SYT line by 8".

You should now have 2 pattern pieces like these: (Note that the 7" line on both is on a fold.)

To make the cutting process easier, cut out one more paper pattern for each of A and B so you now have 2 of each.

Cutting:
Cut 2 x A on fold of fabric
Cut 2 x B on fold of fabric
Cut 4 x B on fold of bump

This drawing is definitely not to scale! :oD

Making them up:
Mark the foldline of the bump pieces with a marker pen or by pressing with your iron. Pin bump to the wrong side of one of the A pieces matching the curved ends.

Stitch down your marked foldline. Fold bump back on itself so you now have a 4 layer thickness.

With wrong sides together, press both B fabric pieces along foldlines. Pin B pieces to the right side of the other A piece matching the curved ends.

Fold the ribbon in half and pin the raw edges to the middle of one of the straight edges of the A piece. Sew ribbon to A using a ½" seam. If you're attaching a label to your oven gloves, do it now.

(I don't have photos of the next bit but I hope it makes sense!)

Pin A pieces with right sides together enclosing the bump and B pieces in the sandwich. Leaving a gap of about 4" along the straight edge without the hanger for turning, stitch using a 5/8" making sure to catch in all your layers. Stitch *slowly* around the curves. If you have a walking foot, use it. It does make sewing all the layers much easier.

Trim seam to about ¼" and clip curves.

Turn through the gap pushing your hands into the ends to push out the seams. Slip stitch the gap closed.

And here they are in use - or showing how they would be used if I'd cooked invisible muffins! :oD

You might also like the following tutorials: flirty frilly pinny, plain pinny, flirty frilly half pinny, single oven gloves and wee and round oven glove.

Thursday, 24 November 2011

more sewing and some crochet

I've been busy sewing again this week. First off I made myself a black skirt - yes, it is as shiny as it appears in the photo!

It fits me perfectly but the material is really stiff so the flounces all stick out more than I'd like them to. I put the skirt in the washing machine this morning to see if the stiffness might soften a wee bit so I'll just wait and see what I think when I take it out of the drying cupboard.

The next thing I made was a flirty frilly half pinny.

This was such fun to make. The main part of the pinny is a fat quarter of fabric and the frills and ties only took ½ yard of material so a great way to use up some bits from the stash. I can feel a few more of those coming on! And, yes, I took a note - and photos - of what I did so a tutorial should be up soon. :o)

Finally, I'm making a scarf for Joanna.

I've only got a few rounds to go and then it's the sewing up and sewing in of the ends. Hopefully I'll get that done this weekend and I'll then decide if she's getting the scarf now or has to wait until Christmas for it. It might be a bit daft to make her wait when she's seen the squares coming together. I'll have to think about that one! :oD